Jan 21, 2013

Asian Confetti Salad

This lively and colorful dish is probably one of the most tasty salads I’ve ever had! Not a lot of greens in this one but many other healthy veggies. Dr. Fuhrman recommends that you have at least one large salad as “the main dish” every day. Eating lots of salads can get boring sometimes. But this one was fun to eat and broke the mold of “just a salad.” Try it and I think you’ll agree!

    for the salad ~

Ingredients:

  • 2 large carrots
  • 1 medium daikon radish root
  • 3-4 large stalks bok choy, leaves included
  • 1 red bell pepper
  • 1 small red onion
  • kelp or dulse flakes for garnish, optional (see notes)

Directions:
  1. Shred the carrots and the daikon in a food processor (you can do it by hand if you don’t have a food processor. Just use the large shred side of a grater).
  2. Finely slice the red pepper, tossing seeds and membranes.
  3. Finely slice the red onion.
  4. Finely slice the bok choy, crossways from the way it grows.
  5. Toss everything together.
  6. Serve with Creamy Asian Dresssing (below)
    for the dressing ~

Ingredients:

  • 2/3 cup vegan sour cream (recipe here) Note: store-bought vegan sour cream will give an entirely different consistency but can be used. Just add a bit more water to the recipe.
  • 2-inch piece of fresh ginger, peeled and finely grated
  • 1 TBS tahini
  • 1 tsp apple cider vinegar
  • 3 TBS water
  • 1/2 tsp toasted sesame oil

Directions:
  • Mix all ingredients together.
Serves 2. (“The salad is the main dish!”) 
Helyn’s Notes: If you are vegan, it is important to make sure to get certain nutrients from your foods. One of those is iodine. Iodine is needed for healthy thyroid function which regulates metabolism. Since I eat very little added salt, which can be another source for iodine, I have found that one of the best sources is in sea vegetables! Seaweeds are, in fact, the richest source of dietary iodine. Kelp is a good source of iodine (1/10th of a teaspoon or one pinch has 150 mcg, the recommended daily intake).

Dulse is a seaweed which grows on the rocky shores of England and Ireland. Dulse flakes are extremely nutrient-rich but contain less iodine than kelp. One benefit is that they are much milder tasting than kelp. However, with a small sprinkling of either one, you won’t taste much of their flavors.

If you really don’t care for seaweeds you can always supplement with a multivitamin such as Dr. Fuhrman’s Gentle Care, which has the correct amount for daily intake of iodine. Use caution with pure iodine supplements as many contain far too much which can also create health problems.
Healthy Trails!
     Helyn

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